All posts tagged: books

January 2016

It’s been a while (like, last summer) since I had read enough (besides the daily swoops through sites like McSweeney’s Internet Tendency) to be able to put together one of these posts. Luckily, hibernation mode is quite conducive to book reading, so I’ve been doing some catching up lately. This issue is just a win-win. Lucky Peach is my favorite magazine and breakfast is my favorite meal. Throw in some kooky illustrations, a story about Mickey Mouse pancakes, and how people from across all the time zones chow down in the A.M, and you’ll be craving a breakfast burrito (or maybe that’s just me). This title piqued my interest because it combined my nerdy, Middlebury-induced interest in Political Science with the food side of things. Unfortunately, this book got really old after a while–I much would have preferred to just read a long newspaper or magazine article. The premise is that for several reasons, Americans waste a lot of food and use too much gasoline. Basically, we think we’re too cool for school. I also …

August 2015

This is my “to read” pile. Seriously. I love to read. I really do. Books, magazines, blogs, you name it. But sadly, since moving to NYC three weeks (where has this time gone?!) ago and taking on quite a few projects that I always feel slightly behind on, reading has been the thing that has dropped off my radar. It’s almost hilarious that the apartment I’m staying in has one of the most beautifully curated bookshelves I’ve ever seen. And now I have this monster stack of titles sitting on this coffee table thing at my feet while I write this post. Sigh. Anyways, in a throwback to my days in Bra when I read four books during my weeklong staycation, I wanted to tantalize you with the titles that I have waiting for me. I admit, I’m a booktease. 1. The Almost Nearly Perfect People. Recommended to me by a friend who spent a few weeks in Copenhagen. After being in Denmark and seeing lots of blond, smiling, long legged people on bicycles not weaving through traffic …

June 2015: Part Two

A few weeks ago, I bought some fava beans at the market and didn’t quite know what to do with them. Enter the Saveur Summer Produce Guide. Happy Saturday and welcome to this week’s edition of “What I’ve Been Reading,” I’m Katherine Harris. Oh wait, this isn’t a podcast. So let’s proceed. After a few weeks of skimming this book for a few minutes at a time, I finally made it through “A Bone to Pick,” a compilation of NYT Op-Ed Contributor and recent Berkeley transplant Mark Bittman’s columns from the last 4 years. The short-ish pieces are organized thematically, grouping together issues like meat consumption and “well, what do we do now?” This book is not going to knock your socks off, but if you’re looking for digestible, mini lessons on things like why factory farms are bad or why farmers’ markets are good, this is the book for you. It’s sort of like Food Issues 101–something that will form the foundation for future research rather than an end-all-be-all kind of work. McSweeney’s Internet Tendency …

June 2015: Part One

Ok obviously I did not take this photo, so don’t hurt me. Here is the caption that accompanied the piece (hold your horses, I will discuss below): “Centuries after the first wheel of Emmentaler rolled into the Alps, scientists are still learning about how Swiss cheese is made.” My caption would be: “Where is the missing fourth?!!” My staycation has come and gone and I made it through quite a long week with some new thoughts on the horizon regarding potential thesis topics. I’m thinking something regarding the millions and zillions of $$$ being dumped into funding food/drink startups (which I initially thought was oh-so-wonderful, but now I’m not so sure) and if we can really “hack” our way to a sustainable food system. Stay tuned. I’ve also been reading quite a bit (as usual). I am telling myself now, at noon on this well-caffeinated Saturday, that every Saturday I will do a roundup of what I’ve been swiping through on my iPad that week, just so you, out there in the internet void, can potentially bookmark …

June 2015: Part One

Well, maybe this isn’t your idea of summer beach reads, but this selection very much reflects some of my current interests: writing, responsible meat consumption and the curious country that is Italy. Four years at a liberal arts college trained me to be a (very) speedy reader. While I no longer settle down with a big mug of coffee (fat chance finding one in Italy) to accompany 150 PDF pages about American foreign policy during the Cold War, I can cruise through a Kindle book (however many pages that actually is in the real world) in a few hours. My staycation so far has given me the opportunity to polish off four (yes, seriously) books. Here are some thoughts on what I’ve been reading as of late, in no particular order other than how I managed to sandwich the screenshot images together. Bird by Bird, Anne Lamott A stream-of-consciousness, hilarious, but also very sincere book about writing and life that has been sitting on my nightstand for a few months in the hope that I would pick it up rather than reading …

March 2015

An illustration from one of my new favorite columns, Food & Consequences by Aaron Thier on Lucky Peach’s website. While this image accompanies a piece on super silly spicy chilies, it also kind of reflects the fire-y frenzy with which I have been attempting to soak in so many forms of written work lately. Read on.  Lists are something that I don’t do quite often on this blog. So today, this semi-spring-y Thursday where I should be paying attention to the temporal dominance of aromas in Wine Sensory Evaluation class but rather am writing this blog post nd researching trendy London locations, is the day! Attention all: I have recently revamped my Chrome bookmarks bar. I also have finally gotten into using Pocket, so now I can keep track of the thingamabobs that I want to read later. But anyways, enough about my organizational tendencies. I want to share some of the things I’ve been reading lately. Mark Bittman put out a column yesterday called “Stop Making Us Guinea Pigs” about how an arm of the WHO identified an active ingredient in …

The 1st (Annual?) Foodbook Swap

The loot up for grabs.  Back at a pizza party in December, an idea was born. I noticed a hefty stack of books and magazines on Francesca’s shelf that quite looked intriguing. It made me think of a hefty stack of books and magazines of my own sitting unattended on my desk back home in California. So, we arranged to have a swap of sorts. After the Christmas break, there would be an afternoon of tea and shortbread cookies in the shape of a cow and the opportunity to trade texts with someone else from the university. The idea was pretty darn simple–pass along good book mojo in return for something equally exciting. Maybe a cookbook from Georgia? Or a German guide to entertaining from the 1970s? I brought back some copies of Lucky Peach, My Berlin Kitchen, The Sweet Life in Paris and Medium Raw. They were all snapped up quite quickly. And I came away with an issue of Mood magazine that I am quite excited to sink my teeth into (get it? a food magazine? teeth?). …

The Slow, Slow Food Revolution

Can you judge this book by its cover? Before Christmas break, I overzealously checked out several books from the UNISG library when I had the realization that the kind of books I usually purchased on my iPad Kindle app (food memoirs! anything and everything Michael Pollan!) were available on the second floor of my building. Of course I ended up toting them all home in my backpack because I let them accumulate some dust on my coffee table for a few weeks rather than actually read them. Ok. So. This book. The Slow Food Revolution. I’ve gotta tell you, for my first book about the history of the snail, it was the wrong choice. It was a serious hodgepodge of Petrini’s own memories as told by a ghostwriter and awkward Italian translations. Let me back up. What this book did deliver was a little bit of insight into how the superstar community organizer/orator CP and his red-leaning buddies in Bra utilized leftist outlets of communication to start an organization based on the pleasures of eating and drinking…which …

43 Hours in Healdsburg

My inaugural pilgrimage to the SHED was every bit as amazing as I anticipated. Don’t you love it when that happens? The NYT has their 36 Hours travel columns, there was that movie where James Franco cut his arm off after 127…but I am neither of those things so here I am to relay my quick trip up to H-burg (I’ve decided to call it that, just roll with it) with my mom for a few days before I pop back over the Atlantic to Italy. Note: this place is only one hour from San Francisco. On a road trip, obviously the job of the DJ/ navigation system manager stokes hunger, so I requested/demanded a stop at Farmstead Restaurant in St. Helena on the drive up. Last December, I took a “Full Circle Tour” with my parents of Long Meadow Ranch’s organic farm and vineyards before sitting down for a delicious lunch filled with persimmons and olive oil inside the tasting room, but this time I wanted to go peek into their restaurant. Sufficiently farm-chic decor, don’t you think? We …