All posts tagged: lucky peach

January 2016

It’s been a while (like, last summer) since I had read enough (besides the daily swoops through sites like McSweeney’s Internet Tendency) to be able to put together one of these posts. Luckily, hibernation mode is quite conducive to book reading, so I’ve been doing some catching up lately. This issue is just a win-win. Lucky Peach is my favorite magazine and breakfast is my favorite meal. Throw in some kooky illustrations, a story about Mickey Mouse pancakes, and how people from across all the time zones chow down in the A.M, and you’ll be craving a breakfast burrito (or maybe that’s just me). This title piqued my interest because it combined my nerdy, Middlebury-induced interest in Political Science with the food side of things. Unfortunately, this book got really old after a while–I much would have preferred to just read a long newspaper or magazine article. The premise is that for several reasons, Americans waste a lot of food and use too much gasoline. Basically, we think we’re too cool for school. I also …

August 2015

This is my “to read” pile. Seriously. I love to read. I really do. Books, magazines, blogs, you name it. But sadly, since moving to NYC three weeks (where has this time gone?!) ago and taking on quite a few projects that I always feel slightly behind on, reading has been the thing that has dropped off my radar. It’s almost hilarious that the apartment I’m staying in has one of the most beautifully curated bookshelves I’ve ever seen. And now I have this monster stack of titles sitting on this coffee table thing at my feet while I write this post. Sigh. Anyways, in a throwback to my days in Bra when I read four books during my weeklong staycation, I wanted to tantalize you with the titles that I have waiting for me. I admit, I’m a booktease. 1. The Almost Nearly Perfect People. Recommended to me by a friend who spent a few weeks in Copenhagen. After being in Denmark and seeing lots of blond, smiling, long legged people on bicycles not weaving through traffic …

March 2015

An illustration from one of my new favorite columns, Food & Consequences by Aaron Thier on Lucky Peach’s website. While this image accompanies a piece on super silly spicy chilies, it also kind of reflects the fire-y frenzy with which I have been attempting to soak in so many forms of written work lately. Read on.  Lists are something that I don’t do quite often on this blog. So today, this semi-spring-y Thursday where I should be paying attention to the temporal dominance of aromas in Wine Sensory Evaluation class but rather am writing this blog post nd researching trendy London locations, is the day! Attention all: I have recently revamped my Chrome bookmarks bar. I also have finally gotten into using Pocket, so now I can keep track of the thingamabobs that I want to read later. But anyways, enough about my organizational tendencies. I want to share some of the things I’ve been reading lately. Mark Bittman put out a column yesterday called “Stop Making Us Guinea Pigs” about how an arm of the WHO identified an active ingredient in …

Go for the Goat

The scene of the crime: Azienda Agricola Monte Jugo in Viterbo, Lazio, Italy. Pietro, our fearless tutor (not like someone that helps you get good grades, more like the person who made sure we stayed 23 people all week) on the left and Ferdinando, the owner, on the right. Yesterday and the rest of today will be filled with a seminar on “Enogastronomical Communication” (translation: Food Writing) with Corby Kummer, senior editor at The Atlantic and author of several books on making coffee. I passed Amazon links said books along to a coffee-crazed friend, noting that a lot of ground has been covered in the last 10 years and it seems now that things that were once reserved for chemistry class are not being used to brew a cup of joe. If nothing else, this man has presence. He positioned himself on top of a desk, no powerpoint in sight, with his legs crossed, showing off his 50 shades of grey socks, and we began to discuss our first of three assignments. 1. Select a 1-2 …