All posts tagged: slow food

Bye Bye, Bra

Both the Dean and the Spiritual President (definitely his official title) were out of town, so the guy on the right here (Michele Fino, a UNISG Food Law professor) made a joke about having to bring out the B team for the graduation. The guy on the left (Slow Food International Secretary General Paolo DiCroce) was not amused. I did it! I have a Master’s degree (in Food Culture and Communication with a focus in Representation, Meaning and Media) with a title almost as long as my undergraduate degree (International and Global Studies with focuses in Political Science, Latin America, and Spanish)! After wrapping up my internship commitments here in New York at Saveur and Food Tank, launching a personal website, starting a new stream of stories for Contemporary Food Lab, turning in my thesis (a blend of personal experience and theory), I embarked upon a much needed week (or two, let’s see) of resting priority-resetting (as well as immune system-resetting). This meant good, nourishing food (chestnut and pumpkin soup!), not waking up at 5:30 AM, spending leisurely afternoons and evening drinking …

An Event-Full Weekend

A panel at Taste Talks Brooklyn about staying current in the ever-changing landscape of food. The last few weeks have just zoomed by. How is it already Wednesday again? How am I just catching you up on three educational/inspirational events from two weekends ago just now? How is it fall already? Ok, enough with the existential questions. Slow Food NYC recently held a series of events with Canadian cheesemaker David Asher, known for tinkering around with molds in his home to get his bloomy rinds just right. I went to the opening night reception in a cave (that was once a 19th century brewery!) somewhere in Brooklyn that I had not yet ventured to before and learned about the history of kefir. How typical of me. Here’s Slow Food USA Executive Director Richard McCarthy introducing David. At first I wondered, “Who is this guy in a suit?!” Most people were wearing Birkenstocks. And then I realized it was him. Alrighty then. Anyways, back to fermentation. According to David, kefir grains originated somewhere in Central Asia. Apparently …

A Brutally Honest Review of EXPO Milano 2015

The biggest winners at the EXPO? The designers, architects and illustrators who were commissioned to design the pavilions and the content inside. Yesterday, I made the journey over to the World’s Fair, which started on May 1 with a mild case of anti-capitalist protests and angry op-eds about the fact that the lead sponsors include McDonald’s and CocaCola–companies that don’t exactly jive with the tagline of “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life.” A few things to note: the site IS in fact there. Like the lead up to any Olympics, haters gonna hate and say that there will be no doors on the bathroom stalls or something like that. There is actually a railway stop right outside the fairgrounds, which is quite convenient. It is where I met up with my friend Joe (who I had many an adventure with in Buenos Aires) and his girlfriend Paola, studying abroad in Florence and up to Milan to rendezvous for the day. Without really knowing what was going on, we took our first steps inside the UN …

A Snow Day Excursion (Sort Of…)

Le dolce at the charming, traditional Piemontese spot in Cherasco: Osteria La Torre. It snowed/rained yesterday! Our Biodynamic/Viticulture class was cancelled (because the professor was sick, not because of the snow, though I’m sure the Italians are freaking out about their driving abilities currently) and so I embarked with 3 friends on a lil’ excursion over to Cherasco– the town on top of a hill about 20 minutes from Brawhere almost everything always is closed. So I have to say, if there are any Slow Food spies reading this website, I’ll probably get in trouble for saying this…but I liked it better than Boccondivino AKA SF HQ. It was just so cozy and delicious. We were the only table of guests in there for a while and ordered two of each course, chatted, had a jug of wine and just generally enjoyed each other’s company for about 3 hours. Oh Italia. This cheese cart was looking quite fierce, but I’ll have to go back another time… As has been the case since I arrived in this little corner of the …

The Slow, Slow Food Revolution

Can you judge this book by its cover? Before Christmas break, I overzealously checked out several books from the UNISG library when I had the realization that the kind of books I usually purchased on my iPad Kindle app (food memoirs! anything and everything Michael Pollan!) were available on the second floor of my building. Of course I ended up toting them all home in my backpack because I let them accumulate some dust on my coffee table for a few weeks rather than actually read them. Ok. So. This book. The Slow Food Revolution. I’ve gotta tell you, for my first book about the history of the snail, it was the wrong choice. It was a serious hodgepodge of Petrini’s own memories as told by a ghostwriter and awkward Italian translations. Let me back up. What this book did deliver was a little bit of insight into how the superstar community organizer/orator CP and his red-leaning buddies in Bra utilized leftist outlets of communication to start an organization based on the pleasures of eating and drinking…which …

“Why Vermont?”

Yesterday, I met Santa Claus. Well, not exactly. I met Carlo Petrini, who kind of reminded me of Santa for his mythical qualities. I feel like I could have gone up to the podium and sat on his lap and told him that all I wanted for Christmas was to save rare acorns in the world. With the assistance of a handy dandy simultaneous translation kit that looked like a stethoscope, Carlo engaged in some small talk with us new Masters students, provided a glimmer of hope in the midst of the doom and gloom of our food system today and offered some insight on being with the same 23 people all the time. He basically said it’s ok if you hate someone but you have to tell them to their face and then just get over it because we’re all here to talk about food. When my last name was appropriately pronounced in Italian (“air-eeeees”) I raised my hand, lied as usual and said that indeed I was from San Francisco (sorry not sorry) and then he asked the question …

Pop-Up Slow Food Fast Food

When is the last time I went to McDonald’s? Honestly, I couldn’t tell you. Maybe to buy a bottle of water on the way up to Tahoe one time. On Saturday night, I went to a Pop-Up dinner called “McJam” organized by a very savvy individual who knew how to use a Doodle poll (shoutout to Middlebury College for teaching me how to use those) and also how to cook really good, responsibly sourced typical “fast food” (hence the confusing title of this post). Of course, given that this is Italy, apartments here do not have an actual number. For example, there is no “200 Oak Street, Apt 2.” No no no, all the apartments are just “200 Oak Street.” How helpful! So I thought I would be roaming the rainy streets of Bra trying to sniff out the smell of a deep fryer. Luckily, this same savvy Doodle person put a poster outside on the ground floor saying to come on up to the 3rd floor. Good sign. To be honest, “McJam” was kind of an …