All posts tagged: writing

Cycles

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about cycles. About how things repeat, but also don’t quite ever remain the same. About how energy flows. How emotions wax and wane. (I’m also thinking about bicycles, but that’s more of a witty aside.) I’m a person who likes structure. I write to do lists. I cross things off. I write more to do lists. I cross more things off. Repeat, adapt, repeat, adapt. But another side of me is enjoying this *very* unique (for me), non-INTJ cycle (summer light-induced, no doubt) right now where I feel free and open and mobile and friendly. This is a good cycle. No, this is a GREAT fucking cycle. Because I can think back to a not-so-distant past where I felt the opposite of all of these things. It was a no bueno cycle. Maybe cycles are more like ruts. Because I’m also in a cycle of “not writing.” I feel so many things about this! Embarrassed. Ashamed. Guilty. Like maybe because I haven’t been doing what I love doing for …

Bye Bye, Bra

Both the Dean and the Spiritual President (definitely his official title) were out of town, so the guy on the right here (Michele Fino, a UNISG Food Law professor) made a joke about having to bring out the B team for the graduation. The guy on the left (Slow Food International Secretary General Paolo DiCroce) was not amused. I did it! I have a Master’s degree (in Food Culture and Communication with a focus in Representation, Meaning and Media) with a title almost as long as my undergraduate degree (International and Global Studies with focuses in Political Science, Latin America, and Spanish)! After wrapping up my internship commitments here in New York at Saveur and Food Tank, launching a personal website, starting a new stream of stories for Contemporary Food Lab, turning in my thesis (a blend of personal experience and theory), I embarked upon a much needed week (or two, let’s see) of resting priority-resetting (as well as immune system-resetting). This meant good, nourishing food (chestnut and pumpkin soup!), not waking up at 5:30 AM, spending leisurely afternoons and evening drinking …

An Event-Full Weekend

A panel at Taste Talks Brooklyn about staying current in the ever-changing landscape of food. The last few weeks have just zoomed by. How is it already Wednesday again? How am I just catching you up on three educational/inspirational events from two weekends ago just now? How is it fall already? Ok, enough with the existential questions. Slow Food NYC recently held a series of events with Canadian cheesemaker David Asher, known for tinkering around with molds in his home to get his bloomy rinds just right. I went to the opening night reception in a cave (that was once a 19th century brewery!) somewhere in Brooklyn that I had not yet ventured to before and learned about the history of kefir. How typical of me. Here’s Slow Food USA Executive Director Richard McCarthy introducing David. At first I wondered, “Who is this guy in a suit?!” Most people were wearing Birkenstocks. And then I realized it was him. Alrighty then. Anyways, back to fermentation. According to David, kefir grains originated somewhere in Central Asia. Apparently …

Finding a New Rhythm

This is where the magic happens, folks. Well, when I’m not running around. Throughout high school and college, I learned that there is a fine line for me between “busy but feeling challenged and fulfilled in a good way” and “busy like I just want to stop doing everything because I’m so overwhelmed.” (Note that I did not include grad school in that educational list because looking back, I can see that I will probably never (ok, maybe until I retire) have the amount of time that I had in Bra to just think, listen to podcasts, go for long walks, and read to my heart’s content. Oh man.) Anyways, this first working week in New York has been a bit…stressful. Not content to just do one office internship like a sane person, I signed on for a remote internship, some contract work, and contributing articles too. I’ve gone back and forth between thinking that I have taken on too much and that I just need to give myself more time to figure out when …

The Last Supper: UNISG Lunch Edition

Some of my classmates surveying a spread of tomatoes, pasta salads, lemon cake and lentils.  Class is over. No more 3 hour lectures stuck in uncomfortable chairs, no more attendance checks, no more bus rides to Pollenzo. By comparison to my last day at Middlebury, yesterday afternoon felt quite unremarkable. We each brought a dish that we could tell a story about, we sat down together around a large table, there was some wine, we cleaned up, and that was it. No fireworks. No nothing. I think it was partly because the visiting professor offered up some of his very apt observations about our class, namely that we were a fragmented bunch each looking ahead to going our own way. I can certainly say that I feel and have felt that way for a while–being in and around a group of 24 students was overwhelming for me at times, so I snuck in some alone time wherever I could. And now we’re headed off for a few months of internship. Some to work in kitchens, …

June 2015: Part One

Well, maybe this isn’t your idea of summer beach reads, but this selection very much reflects some of my current interests: writing, responsible meat consumption and the curious country that is Italy. Four years at a liberal arts college trained me to be a (very) speedy reader. While I no longer settle down with a big mug of coffee (fat chance finding one in Italy) to accompany 150 PDF pages about American foreign policy during the Cold War, I can cruise through a Kindle book (however many pages that actually is in the real world) in a few hours. My staycation so far has given me the opportunity to polish off four (yes, seriously) books. Here are some thoughts on what I’ve been reading as of late, in no particular order other than how I managed to sandwich the screenshot images together. Bird by Bird, Anne Lamott A stream-of-consciousness, hilarious, but also very sincere book about writing and life that has been sitting on my nightstand for a few months in the hope that I would pick it up rather than reading …

Go for the Goat

The scene of the crime: Azienda Agricola Monte Jugo in Viterbo, Lazio, Italy. Pietro, our fearless tutor (not like someone that helps you get good grades, more like the person who made sure we stayed 23 people all week) on the left and Ferdinando, the owner, on the right. Yesterday and the rest of today will be filled with a seminar on “Enogastronomical Communication” (translation: Food Writing) with Corby Kummer, senior editor at The Atlantic and author of several books on making coffee. I passed Amazon links said books along to a coffee-crazed friend, noting that a lot of ground has been covered in the last 10 years and it seems now that things that were once reserved for chemistry class are not being used to brew a cup of joe. If nothing else, this man has presence. He positioned himself on top of a desk, no powerpoint in sight, with his legs crossed, showing off his 50 shades of grey socks, and we began to discuss our first of three assignments. 1. Select a 1-2 …